Ninety-Eights and Ninety-Nines

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An addendum to Sekapon predicates.

An addendum to Sekapon predicates.

More predicates, this time for Sekapon. Funny that, I tend to work directly in Sekapon’s scripts but I rarely do that for other languages.

More predicates, this time for Sekapon. Funny that, I tend to work directly in Sekapon’s scripts but I rarely do that for other languages.

More HI predicates. Also a bonus on how to form questions using other verbs in HI.

More HI predicates. Also a bonus on how to form questions using other verbs in HI.

Some time in the last billion years or so the kilis (original inhabitants of Pseudo) underwent, as a species, a intense alteration in reproductive capability. Actually, it was only a small group at first but it caught on.

Instead of requiring two participants to create a new offspring, it required three, and although the exact combination of sexes (there are four of them due to some… interesting developments which happened slightly earlier on) is not important, the resulting offspring always has a predictable sex. You can refer to the table above, but you can also follow this simple rule:

Majority rules, or the one unseen.

Majority rules means that if there is one sex that has more participants than any other sex, (and there can only be one that has more due to the design of the system!) the offspring gets that sex. For example, P + P + Q → P; S + S + S → S.

The one unseen means that if there is no majority, then the offspring will be the sex that makes the four of them together be 1 P, 1 Q, 1 R and 1 S. For example: P + Q + R → S; S + P + Q → R.

The consequences of a fully predictable output sex for any three input sexes is up to the reader to speculate.

Some time in the last billion years or so the kilis (original inhabitants of Pseudo) underwent, as a species, a intense alteration in reproductive capability. Actually, it was only a small group at first but it caught on.

Instead of requiring two participants to create a new offspring, it required three, and although the exact combination of sexes (there are four of them due to some… interesting developments which happened slightly earlier on) is not important, the resulting offspring always has a predictable sex. You can refer to the table above, but you can also follow this simple rule:

Majority rules, or the one unseen.

Majority rules means that if there is one sex that has more participants than any other sex, (and there can only be one that has more due to the design of the system!) the offspring gets that sex. For example, P + P + Q → P; S + S + S → S.

The one unseen means that if there is no majority, then the offspring will be the sex that makes the four of them together be 1 P, 1 Q, 1 R and 1 S. For example: P + Q + R → S; S + P + Q → R.

The consequences of a fully predictable output sex for any three input sexes is up to the reader to speculate.

The syllable structure is pretty predictable too.

The syllable structure is pretty predictable too.

We’ll start off with the formalities first: let’s have some phonemic inventories and phonotactics. Of note is the fact that yes, there’s only one R/L-like consonant, but on the other hand the tones aren’t too off the rocker either. Give and take.

We’ll start off with the formalities first: let’s have some phonemic inventories and phonotactics. Of note is the fact that yes, there’s only one R/L-like consonant, but on the other hand the tones aren’t too off the rocker either. Give and take.

So here’s the plan: we’re making an Esperanto-like language but with the Sinitic language as the base, as opposed to what Esperanto really uses, which is the European languages. We’ll see how it goes.

So here’s the plan: we’re making an Esperanto-like language but with the Sinitic language as the base, as opposed to what Esperanto really uses, which is the European languages. We’ll see how it goes.

Wahey, that’s an interesting project now is it?

Wahey, that’s an interesting project now is it?

Predicates part I in HI. HI has a much more interesting predicate system…

Predicates part I in HI. HI has a much more interesting predicate system…

Predicates in EP.

Predicates in EP.

A while back, I found some people on my dashboard scoffing at how silly it is that word-counters can return different results on the same bit of text. Of course, life is rarely this simple, and in this case you can thank one single punctuation mark for it:

-

Microsoft Word for instance, will say that the phrase “Use the word-counter to re-educate the baby-eaters” has 7 words in it, but personally, I read it as 9 words. Particularly naïve word counters might claim that it has 10 words in it, considering that “re” and “educate” are also words in their own right.

Perhaps you agree with MS Word and really think the sentence has 7 words in it, but would you really agree that the sentence “And then the entire class gave me a what-on-Earth-are-you-doing-you-trigg​er-happy-jump-to-conclusions-low-life look” only has 10 words? But on the other hand, if you really do think that all the words here are separate, what do you think of the subphrases “trigg​er-happy” and “low-life”? Are they genuinely two words when the combination of the two mean so much more than the two words in isolation?

On the other hand, “This bottle measures 5 ± 1 cm tall” can have 8 words in it, but more normally people will reply that it has 5 words in it, taking the entirety of “5 ± 1 cm” as one word. On the other hand, if a word counter expands the symbols, “5 plus-or-minus 1 centimetres”, and it counts “plus-or-minus” as three words, then the sentence has 10 words. Even more confusingly, I personally consider “5 ± 1” as one word and “cm” as another, so I would disagree with all of those and say that this sentence is six words long.

In conclusion, an old adage goes, “every sign has a story behind it”. Seeing a sentence like that should have you investigate, after you get your shock.

A speedometer.

A speedometer.

A teacher explains units to the class.

Œn·gu: esešor llisba bonsiptši_in. Œkš soj_ŕāgîdž: 2 F:1. Œkš sol_ŕambëħini_galzárdō: 2 F:2.

speed TOP is units important_INTENSE. Goes ART-SPC_Luggage 2 F:1. Goes ART-DEF_Lamborghini_Gallardo 2 F:2

Speed: units are very important. The Luggage moves at 2 F:1[1]. A Lamborghini Gllardo moves at 2 F:2[2].

[1] The unit F:1, named pyorn, is the speed it takes to travel 1 ferā (~5⅓ m) in 1:1 (one daħe, ~41 seconds). This works out to be about 10 cm/s.

[2] The unit F:2, named pyorn_in, is the speed it takes to travel 1 ferā (~5⅓ m) in 1:2 (one ilostoy, ~0.11 seconds; 360:2 = 1:1.). This works out to be about 46.8 m/s, 168 km/h or, conveniently for the Americans and British, almost exactly 100 mph (it’s actually 104 mph).

And here’s the actual translation.

And here’s the actual translation.

Oct 9
A new translation exercise. (Unicorns!) A new translation exercise. (Unicorns!)